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What are my rights as a tenant if my landlord is continuously harassing me with unfair and fictional fees?

In the United States, landlord harassment is illegal and can take many forms, including verbal abuse, physical intimidation, and constant complaints.

As a tenant, you have the right to live in a safe and peaceful environment, free from harassment by your landlord.

According to the Fair Housing Act, landlords are prohibited from discriminating against tenants based on race, color, religion, sex, familial status, national origin, or disability.

If your landlord is harassing you, document each incident, including dates, times, and details, and consider writing a letter requesting the harassment to stop.

You can dispute unfair landlord charges by creating a paper trail and sending a formal business letter to your landlord, explaining your position clearly and providing evidence to back up your claims.

Landlords can be held liable for physical and emotional distress caused by harassment, and you may be entitled to actual damages, punitive damages, and attorney fees.

In some states, landlords are required to provide written notice of rent increases, and failure to do so can be considered harassment.

A "Notice to Pay or Quit" letter from your landlord is not an eviction notice, but rather a demand for payment of alleged fees.

You can involve a third party, such as a community mediation center or small claims court, to resolve disputes with your landlord.

Keep a log of every encounter with your landlord, including dates, times, and details, as evidence in case of disputes.

You can ask a witness to be present during interactions with your landlord to provide additional evidence.

Sending a certified letter with return receipt requested can provide proof of mailing and help establish a paper trail.

Consider involving local law enforcement or a tenant rights organization if your landlord's harassment is severe or threatening.

Landlords who use self-help to evict tenants, without following the legal eviction process, may be guilty of landlord harassment.

Know your state's specific landlord-tenant laws, including rent control and eviction procedures, to better protect your rights as a tenant.

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